On My Radar

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Easter was yesterday, in case you don’t celebrate it. I had a fabulous time with my family at church and brunch. I am now having a not so fabulous time writing essays and studying for tests, so today’s blog post is going to be short and sweet.

Do audiobooks count as reading? 

Art lessons from Georgia O’Keeffe 

If literature’s complicated men were on Tinder

Proof that cats are liquid

One White House, many eggs, and decades of scary bunnies 

Peeps beer…who knew

Are you a “book spines face out” kinda person, or an artsy “titles face the wall” kinda person? I think I prefer being able to read my book titles, honestly. (Thanks, Mom, for the interesting read!)

What do you think the best Easter eggs are? I ran a Twitter poll (check it out HERE) and the winner was obvious: Reese’s eggs. I prefer M&M eggs. Good Housekeeping checked out tons of different eggs, and ranked them based off appearance, taste, and quality so you’re sure to get the best stuff in your basket.  #themoreyouknow

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DIY Easter Eggs to Rival Martha Stuart

Dying Easter eggs has been a tried and true spring tradition at my household. I’m creative and ambitious, so of course I’m eager to try new egg dying techniques! My family’s Easter eggs have gotten more creative over the years, thanks to my curiosity and my mom’s undying interest in trying all the new egg dying kits on the market (and there are some great ones this year). We’ve made Pysanky eggs, tie dyed, sticker covered…you name it and we’ve probably tried it!

Marbled Eggs

Last year I made marbled eggs, and they were a huge hit! Better yet, they were crazy easy.

DIY Marbled Easter Eggs

Shaving Cream Eggs

This post from thegoodstuff makes Easter egg dying look so simple! Plus, kids love playing with foam  shaving cream. I’d suggest, if you have small children or especially messy ones, doing this outside on grass or cutting a garbage bag in half and laying it down as a no-fuss mat if you’re indoors. Putting the dying shaving cream in muffin tins is also a genius way to cut down on clean up time (and prevent the mess from going everywhere).

DIY Shaving Cream Easter Eggs

Melted Crayon Eggs

I know my mom would have appreciated this when my brother was little! All you have to do is boil your eggs like you normally would and doodle on them with a crayon while the eggs are still a tiny bit hot. For little, sensitive hands, holding a slightly hot egg with a dish towel works, or even putting the egg in a dixie cup or egg carton (shown below) so it has just enough room to roll around as they scribble. This is a great way to avoid those messy dyes!

DIY Crayon Easter Eggs

Finger Paint Eggs

If you have washable paint and a Sharpie then let’s jump right in! Decide on what animal you want to put on your egg (I’d suggest bunnies and chicks), pick your colors, dip a finger or a thumb in your paint, and dot away. Once the paint dries you go back and draw the details to make your yellow dots chicks and your pink dots bunnies.

This post from Crafty Morning has a lot of great finger painting examples and explains how to finger paint eggs in detail in case you have any questions!

Finger Paint Animals

Sharpie Shadow Eggs

For this idea, all you need are stickers, Sharpies, and eggs. Pick an egg, put a sticker on it, and dot around the sticker to create a “shadow” effect. When you’re done dotting, let it dry for a minute or two and then peel off the sticker. Ta-da! How easy was that?

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What are your favorite ways to decorate Easter eggs?

 

Happy Easter!

In the wake of all the festivities my mom and I found a crazy new way to dye eggs (courtesy of Martha Stuart Magazine). Grab some Mason jars (or any deep, wide mouthed cup), food dye, vinegar, and dried goods like beans, quinoa, and lentils!

Fill your containers about a fourth of the way full with your dried goods. Keep everything separate, and try to have dried goods of different sizes. This will determine how speckled your eggs will be in the end.

Next, add the food dye. I used about 10-20 drops per container. You want the beans, rice, barley, etc. to be damp not wet. If a color dries out when you’re dying your egg, don’t panic! Just add a little vinegar to the cup and mix it around.

To dye your eggs just plop them in the containers and gently shake them around. It’s that easy! And there’s very little dye involved so you can take them out with your fingers and not have to worry about staining your hands! But be sure to let the eggs dry in a egg carton and not on the counter top, just in case.

And there you have it, how to make beautiful speckled and marbled Easter eggs in under five steps!

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xo Bailey

Everything You Didn’t Know About Easter

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From zombie Jesus to monster-sized bunnies breaking into our houses delivering food to our unsuspecting children, Easter is a time of joy for all. No really, I love Easter. My favorite tradition is making Pysanka Easter eggs with my church group. My other favorite thing about Easter is all the wacky facts surrounding the holiday. I’ve rounded up the best of the lot for you:

The UK’s first chocolate egg was made in 1873 (the same year my sorority Delta Gamma was founded!)
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Remember the Easter Bunny I talked about earlier? Yeah, he’s actually
from Europe and came to the US in the 18th century. Probably because all the Europeans got tired of him breaking into their houses or something…

Easter is celebrated at different times depending on if you follow Western Christianity or Eastern Christianity!

76% of people eat the ears on the chocolate bunny first, 5% go for the feet and 4% go for the tail. Personally, I eat the ears first. What about you?

Florida held the largest Easter egg hunt, where 9,753 children searched for 501,000 eggs. (I am not a child but 10/10 would have participated if I were there)

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Happy Easter!

xo Bailey